Vol. XIX Issue 3

April 3, 2013

Dear Readers:

The Richmond Journal of Law & Technology is proud to present its Annual Survey Issue of the 2013-2013 academic year: “e-Discovery: A New Frontier.”  JOLT has consistently been on the forefront of scholarship concerning e-Discovery.  With the ever-increasing pace of technological advancement, and with courts and practitioners grappling with the parameters of e-Discovery, this area of law has never been more important.  This year, we are proud to present four more articles that will continue to develop e-Discovery in this evolving legal field.

In our first article “Local Rules, Standing Orders, and Model Protocols: Where the Rubber Meets the (e-Discovery) Road,” Thomas Y. Allman discusses how the 2006 e-Discovery Federal Rules Amendments have shaped, or not shaped, e-Discovery rules in local jurisdictions.  Mr. Allman argues for more consistency in the local rules.

Our next article, “Social Media Evidence in Government Investigations and Criminal Proceedings: A Frontier of New Legal Issues” Justin P. Murphy and Adrian Fontecilla examine the importance of social media in government investigations and criminal litigation.  Particularly, they discuss access to and use of social media, constitutional issues that social media evidence raises, the authentication and admissibility of such evidence, and the impact of social media on jurors.

In “e-Discovery as Quantum Law: Clash of Cultures—What the Future Portends,” Michael Yager compares the development of e-Discovery to that of Quantum Physics.  He explores how the two ideas both shook up their respective fields, and how e-Discovery needs to be accepted and adapted by practitioners in order to move forward in a cohesive manner.

Lastly, in “Databases Lie! Successfully Managing Structured Data, the Oft-Overlooked ESI,” Conrad Jacoby, Jim Vint, and Michael Simon explore how structured data plays a role in the e-Discovery process, and how such data should be handled.

I would like to extend my deepest gratitude and thanks to this year’s editorial board and staff, without whom this issue would not have come together.  I would like to especially recognize our Editor-in-Chief, Laura H. Cahill for her continued guidance and patience throughout the publication of this issue.

The continued success of JOLT would not be possible without the support of the University of Richmond School of Law faculty, particularly the guidance of Professors Jim Gibson and Chris Cotropia.

We are confident you will enjoy JOLT’s Annual Survey Issue.  On behalf of the entire 2012-2013 JOLT staff, I extend our sincerest thanks for your continued readership.  As always, your comments and suggestions are welcome at jolt@richmond.edu.

 

Best regards,

Samantha N. Wessel

Annual Survey & Symposium Editor

 

8. Local Rules, Standing Orders, and Model Protocols: Where the Rubber Meets the (e-Discovery) Road, by
Thomas Y. Allman 

9. Databases Lie!  Successfully Managing Structured Data, the Oft-Overlooked ESI, by Conrad Jacoby, Jim Vint, & Michael Simon

10. E-Discovery as Quantum Law: Clash of Cultures-What the Future Portends, by Michael Yager 

Download accompanying presentation from Spring 2013 Symposium

11. Social Media Evidence in Government Investigations and Criminal Proceedings: A Frontier of New Legal Issues, by Justin P. Murphy and Adrian Fontecilla 

Download accompanying presentation from Spring 2013 Symposium

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